Monday, December 26, 2011

Skipper's Year End Report for 2011

The virtual loading of this year's haul of bottles and cans was nearing completion when the Boston and Maine local freight pulled up on the adjacent track.  After the last two bags were loaded and the big door slid closed and locked, the blue boxcar was added to the train's consist and enroute to the recycling facility.  Thanks to the good folks at Hillside Lumber for allowing use of their siding for the loading process.
With that chore wrapped up, it was back to my cave where the year's data was examined.

A total of 7,500 pieces of trash was recovered, and the composition of that trash is as follows:


Recyclable (but not redeemable) containers – 35%      (34% in 2010)   (32% in 2009)

Recyclable and redeemable containers – 13%               (18% in 2010)   (23% in 2009)

Miscellaneous Rubbish – 52%                                       (48% in 2010)   (45% in 2009)



SuAsCo Waters (where I most often paddle):

Sudbury River – 24 patrols netted 1558 pieces for an average of 65 per patrol

Assabet River – 35 patrols netted 1941 pieces for an average of 55 per patrol

Concord River – 13 patrols netted 570 pieces for an average of 44 per patrol


 
Other Rivers (visited more than once):

Merrimack River – 2 patrols netted 1,077 pieces for an average of 538 per patrol (Hooksett disks)

Mystic River – 2 patrols netted 336 pieces for an average of 168 per patrol

Ipswich River – 7 patrols netted 188 pieces for an average of 27 per patrol

Shawsheen River – 4 patrols netted 151 pieces for an average of 38 per patrol

Stony Brook – 2 patrols netted 50 pieces for an average of 25 per patrol

Moose River – 3 patrols netted 20 pieces for an average of 6 per patrol

Tidal Waters (Cape Ann) – 11 patrols netted 124 pieces for an average of 11 per patrol


 
Other Rivers (visited one time only):

Charles River – netted 114 pieces

Connecticut River – netted 35 pieces

Millers River – netted 105 pieces

Ware River – netted 22 pieces

Squannacook River – netted 55 pieces

Chipuxet/Worden’s Pond – netted 39 pieces

Lake Cochituate – netted 18 pieces

Lake Quinsigamond – netted 16 pieces


 
Terrestrial Patrols – 26 patrols netted 1089 pieces for an average of 42 per patrol


 
In addition to the usual bottles, cans, and plastic bags recovered, there were 14 tires, 1 television set, 1 propane cylinder, and 801 Hooksett disks recovered from the rivers.


 
Status of Vessels

OK

                                                                   Status of Main Engine

OK
(but starting to burn some oil and the bearings are getting a little noisy)


My thanks to all the folks who’ve supported my trashpaddling efforts, and I hope 2012 is a great year for all!



Here are my two favorite photos from the past year.  The first is “Sunrise for the Blackburn Challenge” and the second is “Doe with Two Fawns”...


7 comments:

Will said...

7500 pieces of trash is an amazing effort, and that picture of the deer reminds me of Bambi

Suasco Al said...

Thanks Will and Happy Holidays!

BaffinPaddler said...

What awesome accomplishments you and collaborators are making. And you keep statistics! I hope you submit that data to some government bodies and get funding for all the hard work you do. You are a riverkeeper extraordinaire! It is sad to see how much trash is in our waterways, but inspiring to have someone like you out there.

Best wishes for the new year.

Suasco Al said...

Thanks BaffinPaddler, Most government agencies down here are stretched pretty thin these days. Their efforts seem to be focused mostly on the highways, parks, etc. Trash in the rivers is mostly recovered by volunteers working with watershed associations or individually.
Imagine you don't see too much trash up your way (near Ottawa) as I've always heard that Ottawa City is one of the cleanest cities in the world. Happy 2012!

Bernie Paquette said...

Happy New Year Suasco Al. From your work and sharing-Nature Refreshed, People Nourished.
Bernie

Brooke said...

Thanks so much for all of your fine work! That breached dam can be tricky sometimes, especially at high water levels. The whitewater further upstream in Maynard poses some challenges too, especially the Mill St. bridge......I've seen many folks flip there. Thanks again......I came across that TV near the Elks Club, but I was late to pick up my kids, so I simply brought it to shore with the intention of getting it later, but you must have beat me to it!

Suasco Al said...

Hi Brooke, Thanks for your comments and the tips about Mill Street, etc.
It must have been someone else that followed up on your retrieval of the television set from the Assabet River near the Elks lot. The TV I got was down on the Concord River near Lowell Rd.